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Exotic Woods

There are some woods — generally described as “exotic” — that are so oily by nature that the oil finish may dry very slowly, or even not at all. Such woods are rarely used as a stock-wood but sometimes appear as forearm tips etc., and as such, as long as the natural oil remains, require no actual protection. Such woods usually take a good polish when buffed. If also porous, perhaps a little hard wax (such as an automobile wax) is a good thought. Any Lin-Speed Oil that has not dried promptly on such woods can be rubbed away with the fingers or a coarse cloth. Any unsatisfactory dry of Lin-Speed, in less than 24 hours, can be considered affected by some adverse condition, no matter where applied. Most exotic woods dry out in a year or so and can be oiI-finished then, perhaps as part of a periodic maintenance application.

Wood Characteristics
Bubinga High density, closed pores, and natural oils can cause problems with Lin-Speed Oil penetration
Cocobolo Very high oil content and high density.
Cumaru High oil content and high density.
East Indian Rosewood High oil content and medium/high density.
Ebonies Some oil present, along with very high densities.
Goncalo Alves High density and natural oils prevent water absorption.
Greenheart High density and natural oils.
Honduran Rosewood High oil content and high density.
Katalox Very high density, along with natural oils.
Kingwood Very high oil content and high density.
Lignum Vitae Extremely high oil content and density pose penetration challenges.
Osage Orange Oils present can give problems.
Purpleheart High oil content and high density.
Rosewoods Typically very oily and very dense.
Santos Mahogany High density and moderately oily.
Teak Oils/resins can present challenges in outdoor applications.
Verawood Extremely high oil content and density can pose challenges.